Thursday, 14 March 2013


Sabrina is a feminine given name taken from the Roman name for a river in mid-Wales which flows into England, there known as the Severn. According to a legend recounted by Geoffrey of Monmouth in the 12th century, Habren or Sabrina, the Latinized form of the river's British or proto-Welsh name, was the daughter of a king named Locrinus by his mistress, the Germanic princess Estrildis. Locrinus ruled England after the death of his father, Brutus of Troy, the legendary second founder of Britain.

Locrinus cast aside his wife, Guendolen, and their son Maddan and acknowledged Sabrina and her mother, but the enraged Guendolen raised an army against him and defeated Locrinus in battle. Guendolen then ordered that Sabrina and her mother be drowned in the river. The river was named after Sabrina so Locrine's betrayal of Guendolen would never be forgotten. According to legend, Sabrina lives in the river, which reflects her mood. She rides in a chariot and dolphins and salmon swim alongside her. The later story suggests that the legend of Sabrina could have become intermingled with old stories of a river goddess or nymph.